The light in his eyes will see no more so bright…

This one’s for my Pierre.  I needn’t use any of my words. Thank you, Bernie, for yours.

RIP Pierre February 6, 2002 - May 29, 2013

RIP Pierre
February 6, 2002 – May 29, 2013

Gulliver’s gone to the final command of his master
His watery eyes had washed all the hills with his laughter
And the seasons can change all the light from the grey to the dim
But the light in his eyes will see no more so bright
As the sheep that he locked in the pen

There’s four feet of ground in front of the barn
That’s sun baked and rain soaked and part of the farm
But now it lies empty so cold and so bare
Gulliver’s gone but his memory lies there

By passing the doors of his life was a stage I remember
And in later years he would cease to bare teeth to a stranger
For sentiment touched him as Cyclamen holds him
And later men came from the town
Who said clear the child this won’t take a while
And Gulliver’s gone with the dawn

 

Gulliver (Empty Sky – 1969)

The Education of Kimoreena Part Deux

Continuing with the thought of a previous post, The education of Kimoreena…(or everything I needed to learn, I learned through Elton John songs), I thought it might be fun to take a look at some of the terms, places, historical figures, musical icons and even pronunciations that I wouldn’t have otherwise known unless I had been listening to Elton John songs and (of course) Bernie Taupin lyrics. Some examples:

  • Hoarding (Better Off Dead: A billboard).
  • Valhalla (Val-Hala: In Norse mythology, Valhalla was the Great Hall of Odin, where the bravest warriors who had died in battle lived forever).
  • Robert Ford (Feel Like A Bullet (In the Gun of Robert Ford): An American outlaw best known for killing his gang leader, Jesse James).
  • Grimsby (Grimsby: A seaport on the Humber Estuary in Lincolnshire, England).
  • Sluice (Grimsby: A water channel controlled at its head by a gate).
  • Pinkertons (Ballad of a Well Known Gun: The Pinkerton National Detective Agency, founded in Chicago in 1850, was long the nation’s largest and most proficient private detective agency).
  • Reno (Ballad of a Well Known Gun: The Reno Gang  carried out the first three peacetime train robberies in U.S. history).
  • Robert Johnson (The Wasteland: An American blues singer and musician, who died at 27, giving rise to much legend, including the myth that he sold his soul at a crossroads to achieve success).
  • Eiderdown (Amoreena: The down of the eider duck, used as stuffing for quilts and pillows).
  • Cyclamen (Gulliver: A genus of 23 species of perennials growing from tubers, valued for their flowers with upswept petals and variably patterned leaves).
  • Hienton (First Episode at Hienton: A small village on the Isle of Wight situated off the south coast of England, famous for Carisbrooke Castle).
  • Cortina (Made in England: The Cortina was Ford’s mass-market compact car and became Britain’s best-selling car of the 1970s).
  • Night Jars (Come Down in Time: Medium-sized nocturnal with long wings, short legs and very short bills).
  • Edith Piaf (Cage the Songbird: Of course, I knew of her, but after listening this song, I discovered her).
  • H.P. Demands (Someone Saved My Life Tonight:  Refers to installment payments.  H.P. stand for Hire-Purchase or Hire-Pay).
  • Dan Dare (Dan Dare (Pilot of the Future): A British science fiction comic hero).
  • Billy Bones (Billy Bones and the White Bird: A fictional character in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel Treasure Island).
  • Catherine Wheel (The Captain and the Kid:  A type of firework that, when ignited, rotates quickly, producing a display of sparks and coloured flame).
  • Pernod (Planes: A brand of green, aromatic anise- and licorice-flavored liqueur, originally from France).
  • Tilting giants on imaginary hills (Planes: Yes, I knew this was Don Quixote, I just never read the story, so it is alluding to when Don Quixote fought windmills that he imagined to be giants).
  • Gri-Gri (Amazes Me: An African talisman, amulet, or charm).
  • Jimmie Rodgers (Jimmie Rodgers Dream: An American country singer, born in Meridien, Mississipi, in the early 20th century, known most widely for his rhythmic yodeling).

I’m sure there are many more (and, yes, it is kind of embarrassing to admit that I didn’t know many of these!), but Bernie is obviously quite more well read than I.  (I blame that on my High School English teacher who had us read The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings instead of classics. Don’t get me started! But I digress).

I still have no idea what “Take Me to the Pilot” means, I’m not quite sure what a “shoorah” is, and I’m pretty sure I don’t want to know what a “Big Dipper” is (although that’s a Gary Osborne song).

And, of course, how can you not love Elton’s very British, very Elton pronunciations like:

  • Garage (I just love to say it that way now)
  • Spain (Never knew the word had 4 syllables)
  • Squirrel (My kids and I love the way he says “Skwee-errrl”)

I’m such a sucker for an English accent and a certain English gentleman singer/songwriter.